Virginia Commonwealth University

VCU Massey Cancer Center

2011 Archive

Researcher Steven Grant appointed to three major committees

Steven Grant, M.D.

VCU Massey Cancer Center researcher Steven Grant, M.D., was recently honored with appointments to three influential committees: one for the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology (ACTION) and two for the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). Shirley Carter Olsson and Sture Gordon Olsson Chair in Oncology Research, associate director for translational research and program co-leader of Developmental Therapeutics, Grant was selected for these positions based on his proven track record in translational research and expertise in biochemistry and pharmacology, respectively.

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Researchers discover mechanism in brain cancer responsible for neuron death

Paul Fisher

Researchers from Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center and the VCU Institute of Molecular Medicine have discovered a mechanism by which glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common form of brain cancer, promotes the loss of function or death of neurons, a process known as neurodegeneration. The findings could lead to new therapies that suppress neurodegeneration caused by GBM and, potentially, a variety of other neurodegenerative diseases.

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VCU Massey Cancer Center researchers overcome barrier to cancer immunotherapy

In lab studies, researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center have effectively reprogrammed cells of the innate and adaptive immune system to overcome a key cancer defense mechanism and develop long-lasting memory to reject breast cancer cells and guard against tumor relapse. Reported in the Journal of Immunology and led by Masoud Manjili, D.V.M., Ph.D., assistant professor of microbiology and immunology at VCU Massey, the study discovered a way to improve adoptive cellular therapy ACT for breast cancer.

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Key function of mutation in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer gene discovered

It is widely known that mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility 1 (BRCA1) gene significantly increase the chance of developing breast and ovarian cancers, but the mechanisms at play are not fully understood. Now, researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center have shown that certain BRCA1 mutations result in excessive, uncontrolled DNA repair, which challenges the prior assumption that mutations in BRCA1 only contribute to breast cancer through a reduction in function.

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Clinical trial shows benefit to adding Avastin to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients

Amid the controversy surrounding the Food and Drug Administration’s ruling that Avastin should no longer be used to treat metastatic breast cancer, a new multinational phase 3 clinical trial shows that Avastin significantly increased tumor response rates in breast cancer patients when given before surgery.

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