Virginia Commonwealth University

VCU Massey Cancer Center

VCU Massey discovery could lead to breakthrough for non-small cell lung cancer

Research at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center led by Charles E. Chalfant, Ph.D., associate professor of biochemistry and molecular biology, discovered a previously unknown mechanism in non-small cell lung cancer cells that contributes to their ability to maintain and grow tumors. Narrowing in on this mechanism could provide a breakthrough for the development of effective therapies for NSCLC and other cancers.

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New function of gene in promoting cancer found

Researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University have discovered that a gene well known for its involvement in tumor cell development, growth and metastasis also protects cancer cells from being destroyed by chemotherapy. By inhibiting the expression of this gene, doctors may have a new viable and effective approach for treating aggressive cancers such as breast, liver and prostate carcinomas, malignant gliomas and neuroblastomas that result from high expression of this cancer-promoting gene.

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VCU Massey Cancer Center awarded $2.391 million grant from Virginia Tobacco Commission

Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center was recently awarded a two-year, $2.391 million grant from the Virginia Tobacco Indemnification and Community Revitalization Commission (Tobacco Commission) to expand the breadth of the Center's community involvement and grow its state-of-the-art clinical research and cancer specialist delivery system. That delivery system is already in place in communities across Virginia, such as in the Lynchburg, Fredericksburg and Newport News areas.

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Knowledge of genetic cancer risks often dies with patients

If you were dying from cancer, would you consider genetic testing? A recent study conducted by researchers from Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center showed that most terminally ill cancer patients who were eligible for genetic testing never received it despite the fact that it could potentially save a relative's life.

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Key leukemia defense mechanism discovered by VCU Massey Cancer Center

Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center researcher Steven Grant, M.D., and a team of VCU Massey researchers have uncovered the mechanism by which leukemia cells trigger a protective response when exposed to a class of cancer-killing agents known as histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs). The findings, published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, could lead to more effective treatments in patients with leukemia and other cancers of the blood.

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