Virginia Commonwealth University

VCU Massey Cancer Center

Massey awarded American Cancer Society Institutional Research Grant for 40th year

For 40 years, the American Cancer Society (ACS) has continuously awarded VCU Massey Cancer Center $270,000 Institutional Research Grants (IRGs). The ACS-IRGs are awarded as block grants to prestigious institutions to provide funding for young investigators with an interest in cancer research.

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New target identified for potential brain cancer therapies

Paul Fisher at his desk.

Researchers from Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) Massey Cancer Center and the VCU Institute for Molecular Medicine (VIMM) have identified a new protein-protein interaction that could serve as a target for future therapies for the most common form of brain cancer, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). 

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Her laugh is the best sound in the world

Mackenzie was just 20 months old when the team at VCU Massey Cancer Center removed a peach-sized tumor from her brain. This Christmas, she’s celebrating her 10th birthday.

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Massey researchers and physicians receive VCU Faculty Excellence Awards

VCU Massey Cancer Center physicians and researchers were recently honored at the VCU School of Medicine’s 16th Annual Faculty Excellence Awards. Established in 1999, these awards formally recognize exceptional faculty for their leadership, mentorship and professional excellence.

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Targeted treatment Herceptin found to greatly improve long-term survival of HER2-positive breast cancer patients

Charles Geyer, M.D., F.A.C.P.

VCU Massey Cancer Center physician-researcher Charles E. Geyer, Jr., M.D., was the National Protocol Officer for one component of a large national study involving two National Cancer Institute (NCI)-supported clinical trials which demonstrated that trastuzumab significantly improves the long-term survival of HER-2 positive breast cancer patients.  The combined study was designed to determine the long-term safety and efficacy of the drug trastuzumab, which is commonly known as Herceptin and is primarily used alongside chemotherapy to treat HER2-positive breast cancer. The study focused on both the overall survival rates of patients up to ten years post-treatment as well as the known and potentially harmful side effects to the cardiac system.

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