Virginia Commonwealth University

VCU Massey Cancer Center

Massey physician-researcher becomes president of the Richmond Academy of Medicine

VCU Massey Cancer Center’s own Harry D. Bear, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Breast Health Program and medical director of the Clinical Trials Office at Massey, will officially be inaugurated as the Richmond Academy of Medicine’s (RAM) new president on January 12.

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Integrative Health team member highlight: Jim Bonomo

Jim Bonomo has been providing chaplaincy services to patients, families and staff at VCU Massey Cancer Center and Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU (CHoR) for more than 17 years. Though he has transitioned to part-time, his brightly colored socks and ties and comforting presence are still a fixture in Massey’s Dalton Oncology Clinic and the Pastoral Care Department at VCU Health. 

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Spirituality and Cancer

Results from a survey recently conducted at VCU Massey Cancer Center indicated that spirituality was the number one integrative health topic in which patients are interested. Exactly what is meant by spirituality? Different things for different people, it turns out. Even though spirituality and religion are sometimes used interchangeably, they can have very different meanings for different people. 

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Integrative health recipe corner: cherry berry smoothie & avocado strawberry caprese

The American Institute for Cancer Research’s (AICR) and American Cancer Society’s (ACS) recommendations for cancer prevention and survivorship include a diet full of vegetables and fruits. Vegetables and fruits provided fiber, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and other plant compounds that have been found to have cancer-protective effects. Not only are vegetables and fruits helpful for cancer prevention, they are also important components for the prevention of other chronic diseases.

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Integrative health myths and facts: turmeric and cancer

The buzz on the internet is that turmeric can help prevent and/or cure cancer. As we begin exploring more integrative health options, many of these herbal supplements and “folk” medicines are reported as cures or alternative to mainstream medicine in the media and on the internet. But is there evidence-based research to back up the claims?

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