Virginia Commonwealth University

VCU Massey Cancer Center

Clinical news

International study co-led by Massey researcher finds ovarian suppression reduces breast cancer recurrence for some young women

Portrait of Charles Geyer, M.D.

Results from a large international study co-led by a VCU Massey Cancer Center physician-scientist concluded that adding ovarian suppression to adjuvant therapy (post surgery) with tamoxifen substantially reduced breast cancer recurrence in young, premenopausal women with hormone-sensitive early breast cancer who received chemotherapy because of a high risk for recurrence of their cancer.

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Innovative national clinical trial offered at Massey utilizes precision medicine techniques to improve lung cancer treatment

VCU Massey Cancer Center is conducting a novel clinical trial in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute and cancer centers nationwide for patients with squamous cell lung cancer, a type of non-small cell lung cancer with different genetic changes driving the growth of cancerous cells. These genetic changes vary from person to person, and this clinical trial, named Lung-MAP, is unique in offering a targeted approach to better treat the patient.

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VCU Massey Cancer Center becomes the first cancer care provider in Virginia to perform next-generation genome sequencing for precision cancer treatment

VCU Massey Cancer Center has taken precision medicine in Virginia to the next level with the introduction of advanced genomic sequencing for the treatment of cancer. Patients now have in-house access to Oncogenomics DX1, a single test that can sequence their cancer’s DNA and match them with existing or experimental therapies that target the specific molecule or gene driving their disease.

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Knowledge of genetic cancer risks often dies with patients

If you were dying from cancer, would you consider genetic testing? A recent study conducted by researchers from Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center showed that most terminally ill cancer patients who were eligible for genetic testing never received it despite the fact that it could potentially save a relative's life.

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New approaches refine molecular imaging for detecting cancer metastasis

In the new study, published online in the December issue of the journal Nature Medicine, VCU researchers, together with researchers from the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, have shown how the genetic element, known as progression elevated gene-3 promoter, or PEG-Prom, can be used to image metastases in multiple animal models of human melanoma and human breast metastasis. The system can be used to measure gene expression, protein interaction or track gene-tagged cells in vivo. This approach offers significant advantages in sensitivity and accuracy over currently used imaging strategies.

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