Virginia Commonwealth University

VCU Massey Cancer Center

Holding the promise to improved health care

Alex Krist for blog

Electronic health records (EHRs) hold the promise to improve primary health care for millions of patients. However, enhancing current EHR functionality is needed to better support primary care clinicians and patients, according to a recent article.

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VCU Massey researcher works to develop new cancer-fighting drugs and target therapies

Matthew Hartman, Ph.D., has focused his research on two hot topics in the arena of cancer research: developing drugs that inhibit key cancer proteins and developing better ways to target cancer tumors. He studies how proteins interact with each other on the molecular level.

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Discoveries in mitochondria open new field of cancer research

Researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center have revealed novel mechanisms in mitochondria that have implications for cancer as well as many other age-related diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, heart disease and hypertension. This discovery has pioneered the formation of a whole new field within epigenetics research ripe with possibilities of developing future gene therapies to treat cancer and age-associated diseases.

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New biomarker predicts breast cancer relapse

Researchers from Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center have discovered a new biomarker related to the body’s immune system that can predict a breast cancer patient’s risk of cancer recurrence. This breakthrough may lead to new genetic testing that further personalizes breast cancer care.

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Key function of mutation in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer gene discovered

It is widely known that mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility 1 (BRCA1) gene significantly increase the chance of developing breast and ovarian cancers, but the mechanisms at play are not fully understood. Now, researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center have shown that certain BRCA1 mutations result in excessive, uncontrolled DNA repair, which challenges the prior assumption that mutations in BRCA1 only contribute to breast cancer through a reduction in function.

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