Virginia Commonwealth University

VCU Massey Cancer Center

The Promise of Immunotherapy

Recently, the American Association for Cancer Research partnered with Time magazine, the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center and the Cancer Research Institute for a Twitter chat on “The Promise of Immunotherapy.” VCU Massey Cancer Center oncologists and researchers, John McCarty, M.D., and Andrew Poklepovic, M.D., provided expert commentary as the moderators posed a series of questions and discussion topics. 

Continue reading →

Whole exome sequencing shows potential to improve efficacy of stem cell transplants

Stem cell transplant donors and recipients are matched using a process known as human leucocyte antigen (HLA) testing, but graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), in which the donor's immune system attacks the recipient’s body, continues to pose a significant threat to transplant patients. Now, researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) Massey Cancer Center have sequenced the DNA of a small group of stem cell transplant recipients and their donors and discovered significant variation in their exomes that may help explain why some HLA-matched stem cell transplant recipients still suffer from GVHD.  

Continue reading →

Visiting scholar researches palliative and end-of-life care at VCU

Jane Seymour, Ph.D., professor of palliative and end-of-life studies in the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy at the University of Nottingham, traveled to Virginia Commonwealth University from the United Kingdom in April to begin her summer-long appointment as a VCU Global Visiting Scholar.

Continue reading →

Immunotherapy: Unlocking New Ways to Fight Cancer

Learning of a cancer diagnosis has commonly brought with it not only fears for one’s health and one’s life, but the knowledge that the path to successful treatment was by no means easy or risk free. Most chemotherapy and radiation treatments come at a high expense to the patient’s body—harming healthy cells right along with malicious cancer cells and putting patients at risk for other cancers or even other disease or health problemsWhile in the best circumstances the end result is permanent elimination of cancer, in too many instances a few cancer cells survive and lead to relapse. Immunotherapy offers the potential to allow the body to kill the remaining resistant tumor cells.

Continue reading →

New combination therapy developed for multiple myeloma

Steven Grant, M.D.

Each year, more than 25,000 Americans are diagnosed with multiple myeloma, a form of blood cancer that often develops resistance to therapies. However, researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center are reporting promising results from laboratory experiments testing a new combination therapy that could potentially overcome the resistance hurdle.

Continue reading →