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Research

Massey researchers see potential in novel leukemia treatment

Scientists at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center may be one step closer to developing a new therapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after discovering that the targeted agents obatoclax and sorafenib kill leukemia cells much more effectively when combined than when the drugs are administered individually.

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Andrew Poklepovic reviewing imaging results on his office computer.

Clinical trial tests whether immunotherapy helps prevent melanoma recurrence

A stage 2 clinical trial testing the use of immunotherapy after surgery to reduce melanoma recurrence is currently underway at VCU Massey Cancer Center. Led by Andrew Poklepovic, M.D., the trial is eligible to any adult melanoma who is about to or recently underwent surgery and has no evidence of metastatic disease.

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National clinical trial led by Massey researcher provides mastectomy alternative for recurrent breast cancer

Mastectomy has historically been the standard treatment for breast cancer patients experiencing recurrence after an initial lumpectomy and whole-breast radiation. Now, a phase 2 clinical trial led by Douglas W. Arthur, M.D., chair and professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology at VCU Massey Cancer Center and VCU School of Medicine, has demonstrated an effective alternative. 

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Experimental drug combination selectively destroys lymphoma cells

Laboratory experiments conducted by scientists at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center suggest that a novel combination of the drugs ibrutinib and bortezomib could potentially be an effective new therapy for several forms of blood cancer, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL).

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Steven Grant, M.D.

Massey researchers first to show that a specific protein inhibitor successfully kills multiple myeloma tumor cells

Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 7 (CDK7) is a protein that regulates cell cycle progression. However, it also plays a key role in controlling transcription of three genes that help tumor cells proliferate and survive in patients with multiple myeloma, a form of plasma cell cancer.

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