COVID-19: For information related to COVID-19 (formerly referred to as “novel coronavirus"), visit massey.vcu.edu/covid-19

VCU Massey Cancer Center

Menu

Research

Illustration of the COVID-19 Virus

Study shows the experimental drug AR-12 could be a promising COVID-19 treatment

A team of scientists led by Paul Dent, Ph.D., at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center has discovered that an experimental cancer drug called AR-12 inhibits the SARS-CoV-2 virus, the cause of the COVID-19 pandemic, from infecting cells and replicating. Their findings were published online today in the journal Biochemical Pharmacology, and steps are now being taken to develop a clinical trial testing the novel oral treatment at VCU Health.

Continue reading →

Andrew Poklepovic reviewing imaging results on his office computer.

Clinical trial tests whether immunotherapy helps prevent melanoma recurrence

A stage 2 clinical trial testing the use of immunotherapy after surgery to reduce melanoma recurrence is currently underway at VCU Massey Cancer Center. Led by Andrew Poklepovic, M.D., the trial is eligible to any adult melanoma who is about to or recently underwent surgery and has no evidence of metastatic disease.

Continue reading →

Steven Grant, M.D.

Massey researchers first to show that a specific protein inhibitor successfully kills multiple myeloma tumor cells

Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 7 (CDK7) is a protein that regulates cell cycle progression. However, it also plays a key role in controlling transcription of three genes that help tumor cells proliferate and survive in patients with multiple myeloma, a form of plasma cell cancer.

Continue reading →

Massey researcher awarded over $5 million to investigate pediatric obesity and cancer-related co-morbidities

VCU Massey Cancer Center researcher Melanie Bean, Ph.D., L.C.P., was awarded over $5 million in grant funding by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study factors that may impact pediatric obesity and cancer-related co-morbidities among traditionally underserved populations.

 

Continue reading →

There are no targeted drugs to treat triple-negative breast cancer. A VCU student aims to fix that.

Tia Turner, a Virginia Commonwealth University M.D.-Ph.D. student, is searching for novel drug combinations to treat triple-negative breast cancer, a disease that currently has no targeted therapies. She conducts her groundbreaking work in the pathology laboratory of VCU Massey Cancer Center researcher Chuck Harrell, Ph.D., member of Massey's Cancer Molecular Genetics research program and an assistant professor of pathology in the VCU School of Medicine. 

Continue reading →